Taste our Menu Morning at Greenwood Katoomba
May16

Taste our Menu Morning at Greenwood Katoomba

  Come to our amazing Greenwood Katoomba centre and taste our unique Menu, all food is prepared by our in-house qualified chef. Use the opportunity to have a quick tour and get to know our great team. Invite your friends and family for a time out with yummy and healthy food on us! Greenwood Katoomba Monday 4th June 10:30am – 12pm RSVP to our Facebook event! We hope to see you...

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Chicken Fajitas
Feb07

Chicken Fajitas

A wholesome and delicious family favourite perfect for lunch or dinner. Ingredients Serves 4 500g skinless chicken thighs Juice of 1 lime 2 tsp smoked paprika 2 tsp cumin powder 2 tbsp olive oil 2 red onions, sliced 2 small capsicums, sliced 2 gloves garlic, crushed 4 large tortillas 100ml plain Greek yoghurt 1 ripe avocado, mashed Method 1. Slice chicken into 3cm chunks and add to a bowl. 2. Squeeze over lime juice and season with cumin and paprika. Stir to coat. 3. Heat oil in the pan on medium heat and cook chicken thoroughly. Remove from pan. 4. Add onion and capsicum and cook until they start to soften. 5. Add crushed garlic and cook for 1 minute. 6. Return chicken to pan to heat through quickly. 7. Place fajita mix into a serving bowl and serve with tortillas, yoghurt and mashed avocado along with your choice of fresh salad vegetables. Time Prep time: 10 mins Cook time: 15 mins Good nutrition is essential for the health and wellbeing of young children. We are proud to partner with NAQ Nutrition, the Qld Division of Nutrition Australia, by producing recipes that are healthy, delicious and aligned with the Australian Dietary Guidelines....

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How to Remove Guilt from Family Screen Time
Sep28

How to Remove Guilt from Family Screen Time

Article via Kinderling Kids Radio  Screen time is such a hot button issue in modern parenting. Often we feel like whatever we do isn’t right. That’s due in part to the mere fact that our childhood simply didn’t involve screens beyond a TV or maybe a desktop PC with average dial-up internet. When it comes to managing screen time for our kids, Dr Kristy Goodwin and eSafety Commissioner Julie Inman Grant say that there are some ultra-simple guidelines to follow; and all of them revolve around acknowledging that every family has different needs. Quality vs Quantity While it is a good idea to set time limits on device and screen use, Kristy also says that we should be conscious of what our children are watching, playing, and using during that alotted time. While there are governmental guidelines from the Department of Health for amounts of time to spend, they don’t factor in the material consumed. “How much is only one smaller piece of the puzzle,” Kristy says. “We’ve also got to look at what they’re doing with screens when their using screens, how they’re using screens and also who they are using screens with… If we use our guidelines which are based on a child’s chronological age as the starting point, we can then dive deeper and explore the issue in a broader sense.” Banish the techno guilt One of the murky undertones of screen use can be fear of judgement from other parents combined with the thought that we are failing our kids when they are using screens. This just fuels our own feelings of guilt for using technology. Julie insists that this guilt should be banished. Our children are growing up in an era where the concept of a “plugged in childhood” is a reality, and this shouldn’t be stigmatised. Instead Julie says to consider what the screen is being used to displace. Be it a frequency of video games that are displacing outdoor play, or a face to face interaction being sacrificed for one online. So long as a child’s basic developmental needs are met, Julie adds that we don’t need to fret about how much time they’re spending online. “We (as parents) have to set boundaries around when and how or where they use screens,” She says. “And if we balance their screen time with their green time… we can ditch that guilt.” Role modelling It may seem obvious, but our children absorb so much of our behaviours often without our noticing. It’s all well and good to give your children parameters around technology use but if we aren’t giving ourselves the same boundaries, then the messages about a healthy relationship toward screens can be miscontrued as...

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Carrot Cake with Cream Cheese Frosting
Sep14

Carrot Cake with Cream Cheese Frosting

A mildly sweet afternoon tea incorporating a serve of vegetables. Ingredients Serves 18 Cake Canola oil spray 1 cup self-raising flour 1 cup wholemeal self-raising flour ½ tsp bicarbonate of soda 2 tsp cinnamon 1 tsp ground ginger 500g carrots, grated 30g desiccated coconut 30g pecans OR walnuts, chopped 80g sultanas 2 eggs ½ cup apple juice 1 cup low fat milk Frosting 200g reduced fat cream cheese 3 tbsp sugar 2 tsp finely grated lemon zest Method Preheat oven to 200ºC. Lightly spray a loaf tin with oil and line with baking paper. Sift flours, bicarbonate of soda and spices into a large bowl. Add carrot, coconut, nuts and sultanas and mix well. In a jug, beat eggs. Add apple juice and mix well. Then add milk, and stir until well combined. Add liquid to dry ingredients. Stir until well mixed. Pour batter into prepared loaf tin. Bake for 45 minutes or until an inserted skewer comes out clean. Cool cake in tin for a few minutes before turning out on to a wire rack to cool. To make the frosting, beat the cream cheese, sugar and lemon zest together until smooth. Spread mix evenly over cake. Decorate with nuts, grated carrot or lemon zest if desired. Time Prep time: 10 minutes Cook time: 45 minutes Good nutrition is essential for the health and wellbeing of young children. We are proud to partner with NAQ Nutrition, the Qld Division of Nutrition Australia, by producing recipes that are healthy, delicious and aligned with the Australian Dietary...

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Preparing Your Child for their First Day of Childcare
Jul10

Preparing Your Child for their First Day of Childcare

By Venita Rutley Preparing to enter the workforce, or return to the workforce after maternity leave can be a very busy, stressful time for you and your child/ children. So many considerations; which centre will suit me and my child?  What are my expectations of a centre that I am going to leave my child with? How will I know that my child is settled and happy? Is the staff genuinely interested in my child and their interests and development?  From the moment we make the decision to leave our children with others outside of our own family environment, it is very normal that we begin to think about how to best prepare for this transition. Children are incredibly intuitive and pick up on the emotions of their primary caregivers. If we feel doubtful and stressed about leaving our child with others, it is reasonable to acknowledge that our children are going to pick up on these emotions. So how do we best prepare our child for this transition whilst still managing our own emotions? Trust your gut instincts. You may have visited numerous centres to choose the one that feels right and is going to suit not only our needs, but more importantly the needs of our child. You have met the staff, spent time going on a tour, and having orientation visits. I would encourage you to take your child in for as many orientation days that you can. By doing this at different times throughout the day, it will help your child to know what the routine entails, as well as the most important part- building relationships with their carers and other children to help with the first few days of settling in. Talk with the staff about what to expect on your first day of being in care. This will help reassure you that your little ones will be in good hands. Before your child begins Drive past your centre, stop and walk around the outside, explain how many sleeps there is until your child starts playing with new friends and new toys. Acknowledge that you will be busy at work while your child will be busy having fun and playing. Give as many positive details as possible; say things like: you will do lots of painting, building with blocks, playing with train sets etc. Ask them what they are excited about and share in this excitement with them. Start getting up at the time you will when your child starts care, prior to the actual start date. Set the morning routine where possible, so your child will know what to expect:  getting changed, having...

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Pea, Mint and Ricotta Soup
Jun28

Pea, Mint and Ricotta Soup

An easy way to get in extra vegetables.   Ingredients Serves 4 2 tbsp olive oil 2 onions, diced 2 zucchinis, chopped into small cubes 500g frozen peas 1L salt-reduced vegetable stock ¼ tsp white pepper ½ tsp ground nutmeg ¼ cup fresh mint leaves, finely chopped 125g fresh ricotta   Method Heat oil in a large sauce pan. Cook onion until softened. Add zucchini and frozen peas and cook until peas defrost. Add stock and bring to the boil. Stock should be covering peas, add a little extra water if necessary. Once boiling, add pepper and nutmeg. Reduce heat and cook for 15 minutes. Add chopped mint and cook for another five minutes. Remove soup from heat and stir through ricotta. Using a stick blender, process the soup until smooth. Time Prep time: 5 minutes Cook time: 25 minutes   Good nutrition is essential for the health and wellbeing of young children. We are proud to partner with NAQ Nutrition, the Qld Division of Nutrition Australia, by producing recipes that are healthy, delicious and aligned with the Australian Dietary Guidelines.  ...

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